2014.10.02

CNB Buys Land for “Cherokee Outlets”

An overhead view of a proposed Cherokee Nation Businesses development called “Cherokee Outlets.” WILL CHAVEZ/CHEROKEE PHOENIX

An overhead view of a proposed Cherokee Nation Businesses development called “Cherokee Outlets.” WILL CHAVEZ/CHEROKEE PHOENIX

CNB Buys Land for “Cherokee Outlets”

Cherokee Nation Businesses is spending 3.7 million for land near the Hardrock Casino in anticipation of building a premium outlet mall complex with an entertainment center and high-end restaurants. From the Cherokee Phoenix article, it appears the current golf course land may be used for part of the complex building. Although $80 million is to be invested by the mall owners, CNB plans to build the entertainment and restaurant section of the complex. That cost has yet to be announced.

CNB officials said they were negotiating with the golf course architect and hopes to start doing some preliminary work to change the course and move the current clubhouse.

The outlet mall, called “Cherokee Outlets,” has received both support and criticism from Cherokee citizens. Some are happy the Cherokee Nation is buying land that once belonged to the Nation and feel the project will be successful by bringing in visitors and revenue. Others wonder how the planned mall could complete with two other outlet malls that have also been announced to be built in Tulsa.

As mentioned in the previous article (see sidebar: CNB’s Big Announcement…Building an Outlet Mall) the race is now on for signing up retail stores. One mall developer claimed that 90% of their mall was leased while the Cherokee Outlet mall officials said they had yet to start talking to retail clients.

Another harsh criticism that has emerged recently is use of the name “Cherokee Outlets.” The original Cherokee Outlet was land the Nation once owned in Oklahoma that involved legal disputes and widespread fraud. It was also land eventually given away in one of Oklahoma’s land runs. On Facebook sites (from the front page sidebar) some Cherokees felt the name lacked a cultural and historical respect. One Cherokee asked if we are making a “mockery of ourselves” by constantly reminding the public of a treaty breach by the US government.

Another commenter pointed out that a quick Goggle search of the name would have “prevented this name from being so proudly announced to the public.”

As of now, CNB is waiting for the “master plan” from the developers to determine exactly how the new land and complex will shape up.

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